service animal laws Oceanside California

Service dogs in Oceanside are amazing. They have been extensively trained, live strict but loved lives, and take care of their owners like truly no one else can. The dogs’ abilities to detect seizures, pick up dropped items, and even warn owners of impending stroke or heart attack make these dogs literally life savers.

support dog certification

With all the amazing things these animals can do, it’s no wonder we have learned to accept them in places we usually wouldn’t, like a restaurant or the office. But there is a growing cynicism towards service and support animals in general, and mostly because of misunderstanding, and I’ll admit that I used to be one of these people.

I was not raised in a house with pets, and I never could understand the “emotional support animal. I could understand a seeing eye dog or a dog that assists with the hearing impaired, but these are obvious needs that a dog could help with. When I would see articles about an emotional support pig or bunny, I would roll my eyes.

doctor note for emotional support animal

The Best service animal laws in Oceanside

If you are in the US, you may have heard of emotional support animal or ESA. An emotional support animal works like a companion animal for people and patients, for offering therapeutic benefits. Usually such animals are either cats or dogs, although a patient can choose other pets. The whole purpose of an ESA is to offer relief and support for disability, psychological symptoms or emotional stress. Check some of the basic facts you need to know before getting an ESA certificate.

The procedure

To get an emotional support animal, you have to check with your physician to consider the option of proving verifiable disability, as stated by law. Your doctor or medical professional will give a note or a certificate, which will mention the concerned disability and the need for emotional support animal that will offer therapeutic care and healing. However, the animal isn't treated a service animal and therefore, there is no need for any formal training. In fact, all domesticated animals, including rodents, birds, reptiles, cats and dogs, can become an ESA.

There are professional companies, which can assist you in evaluating if you qualify for ESA evaluation letters, but these services are just meant for assistance. Ultimately, only licensed medical health professionals can offer you the certificate on their professional paper. Check online and you can find simple forms that will help finding your qualification. Don't miss on asking the rules and regulations with your doctor in detail. As a pet owner, you have to find the benefits of having an ESA, so that you can exercise your rights.

doctor note for emotional support animal

What's the Difference Between Service Dogs, Therapy Dogs, and Emotional Support Animals?

Puppies and adult dogs are ideal pets. You must understand that pet ownership requires a great deal of time and effort to ensure the animals receive proper care and attention. In addition, there are certain facts you should consider before you pick a puppy or adult dog up from the Humane Society or other type of pet-adoption center. We provide you with a list below of these facts so you can select a dog in an intelligent manner.

Selecting a Dog That Is Right for Your Lifestyle

A puppy or adult dog should fit into your existing lifestyle in the proper manner for you to enjoy it fully. For example, if you live an inactive lifestyle, you do not need a dog that requires an excessive amount of exercise to keep its energy to a livable level. On the other hand, if you are highly active, you need a dog that can keep up with you. Consult a dog breed selector to assist you in your search for the ideal breed for your lifestyle. By answering a few pertinent questions, the selector is able to provide you the dogs that best fit your lifestyle, including which ones are ideal for children.

Cost of Dog Food and Treats

You should price the cost of dog food and dog treats for the size of the dog that you wish to adopt. Where small dogs only eat a few dollars worth of food and treats a week, a large dog will place a severe dent in your finances weekly as far as food and treats are concerned. In addition, check with a veterinarian to learn which brands of food are the best today. The recommendation changes occasionally. A veterinarian also will advise you on what are healthy dog treats and the treats that may cause your puppy or dog problems.

Learn How to Prevent Fleas

You should learn how to prevent fleas from infesting your puppy or adult dog before you adopt one. Otherwise, the fleas will be a problem quickly. A number of different options are available for flea control from oral medications to topical applications for your puppy or adult dog. Consult a veterinarian as to which is suitable for your age group of dog. In addition, frequent vacuuming of the house and a safe insecticide on the yard also will be helpful to prevent or control the flea problem.

Inquire About Dog Insurance

Since dog owners throughout the United States spend millions, possibly billions of dollars each year on veterinarian bills, you may wish to inquire about dog insurance. Actually, this insurance will cover additional types of pets besides just dogs and commonly is known as pet insurance. It will help reduce the amount of your out-of-pocket expense for medical attention for injuries and other health issues that can occur with your puppy or adult dog.

Dog Ownership Is a Long-Term Responsibility

Along with the other information here, you must consider that dog ownership is a long-term responsibility since the majority of dogs live 12 or more years. For this reason, you must commit to take care of your puppy or adult dog properly for as long as it is alive to ensure that it is healthy. Proper care includes feeding and exercising the dog daily, and grooming it at least once a week if not more often depending on the length of its hair. On top of all this, you should take the dog to the veterinarian for regular checkups and necessary vaccinations along with emergency attention.

Keep all these considerations in mind as you select the perfect puppy or adult dog to adopt for a pet. Dogs are such social creatures that they will appreciate your companionship as much as you enjoy theirs.

doctor note for emotional support animal

Emotional Support Animals

How Should You Act Around a Service Dog?

How should you act around a service dog?

A person's natural instinct is to pet and play with dogs.

Unfortunately, we must all respect the vest or cape of the service dog and ignore the dog as much as possible. That means not petting it, touching it, distracting it, talking to it, teasing it, or especially feeding it.

So, how should you act? Really the best way and only recommended way is by totally ignoring the dog the same way you would politely ignore a wheelchair or cane.

A service dog that is not ignored may become "ruined" and unusable by its owner, and given that service dogs are both very hard to find for specific conditions and extremely expensive (typically averaging $15,000 each) this can be devastating for the dog's owner.

By violating this etiquette, you have also just helped contribute to the person's loss of freedom and possibly made it necessary for the owner to give up the dog, which would be heartbreaking, and for the person to require the use of a Personal Care Attendant (PCA)—another person shadowing them all the time—to provide some of the services that the dog used to perform.

Service Dog Basics for the Public

Do you have a hard time working around a service dog?

It's very hard for some people to be around service dogs and service dogs in-training because a person's natural instinct is to pet and play with dogs, especially the healthy well-kept dogs who work as service dogs.

Unfortunately, we must all respect the vest or cape of the service dog and ignore the dog as much as possible rather than petting it, touching it, distracting it, talking to it or teasing it, or even looking at it.

When the cape/vest is on, the dog is working

After all, whenever the cape is on, the dog is working hard, whether it looks like it to you or not.

Among other things, the dog is working very hard to ignore you and the tiny morsel of food on the floor over there that looks tasty.

The dog is also focused on its handler, remaining alert for any commands, scents, or hand signals for action.

It falls asleep all the time. How is that "working"?

Most service dogs are trained to catch a nap whenever possible during the day to give them the energy they need when their work is most actively needed.

Napping at strategic times, such as lunchtime and meetings, is a type of work essential for them to do their service dog work; the dog is not in any way "falling asleep on the job" in a negative sense.

So, how should you act?

Really the best way is by ignoring the dog the same way you would politely ignore a wheelchair or cane.

The service dog and its handler try to minimize the distraction the dog provides to the public, but the public needs to learn and obey manners with respect to the dog and the disabled person (or dog trainer) also.

Remember that it's not polite to stare, point, or talk about people.

One thing you should never do

It's very impolite to ask why someone uses a service dog because their disability is private health information.

Benefits of service dogs

Service dogs can be of great benefit to people with all sorts of disabilities, including invisible disabilities like diabetes, asthma, vertigo, and psychiatric disabilities.

Don't assume that a person who "looks good" and is with a service dog isn't disabled just because the disability isn't obvious to you.

Bonus: Service dogs are also a calming, friendly presence around the office or place or business.

And finally...

Remember, if a service dog's vest is on they are working.

Service dogs are NOT pets, by law, and interfering with a service dog team is actually a crime in most states.

The same manners that apply to a wheelchair apply to a service dog: that's the easiest way to remember what's right or wrong most of the time.

registered emotional support animal

Quick Aspects About Applying for an ESA Certificate

Sadly, some people are asking whether "service animal" laws are being abused by those who want to scam the system.

There have been news stories, articles, opinion pieces and other editorials where people rant and complain about people they believe to be abusing the system. You hear some complain that they had to sit near a dog at a restaurant that they don't believe is a "real" service dog, or others complain that their neighbors have a pet in a "no pet" building because they claimed the animal is an emotional support animal.

Some of the commentary has an indignant tone, and some people are downright angry.

How does this affect those who legitimately own and use a service animal to better their lives? In many ways.

For one, it can it more difficult to navigate bureaucracy of the world when your claim of a disability and your service or emotional support animal's status is questioned. If a landlord or business owner has heard negative stories claiming that some people are abusing the system, it can cause them to look suspiciously at all claimants.

But that percentage of abuse, which in the area of service animal laws is hopefully small, is arguably a very small price to pay when compared to the higher goal of promoting access and equality for all.

In the end, you cannot control any system to make it 100% abuse proof. So tolerating the few people who scam service animal laws is the price we gladly pay to ensure that the disabled in the great state of California have equal access under law.


The (Common) Sense Pet Professionals

California emotional support animals

emotional support animals Oceanside New York City

Service dogs in Oceanside are amazing. They have been extensively trained, live strict but loved lives, and take care of their owners like truly no one else can. The dogs’ abilities to detect seizures, pick up dropped items, and even warn owners of impending stroke or heart attack make these dogs literally life savers.

certified emotional support animal

With all the amazing things these animals can do, it’s no wonder we have learned to accept them in places we usually wouldn’t, like a restaurant or the office. But there is a growing cynicism towards service and support animals in general, and mostly because of misunderstanding, and I’ll admit that I used to be one of these people.

I was not raised in a house with pets, and I never could understand the “emotional support animal. I could understand a seeing eye dog or a dog that assists with the hearing impaired, but these are obvious needs that a dog could help with. When I would see articles about an emotional support pig or bunny, I would roll my eyes.

how to register a dog as emotional support

The Best esa registration in Oceanside

There is controversy surrounding the roles of animals in the lives of people with disabilities or chronic illnesses. Many of us have seen the posts online about registering your animal as an emotional support animal with a small fee, and being able to keep your animal in a no pets allowed setting. This has led people to question the legitimacy of all service animals and their roles. A feeling of distrust among people who do not understand the difference between these animals, and the rights that accompany them, has been emerging as more people utilize these services.Service Dogs are the most protected and trained of the 3 types of dogs. While many people refer to all 3 types as "service animals", the official names for this type is Service Dog. These dogs are legally considered medical equipment and have a price tag to match, ranging from $10,000- $50,000. They are intensively trained for 1.5-2.5 years, having to pass a variety of tests to be serviceable including, but not limited to, opening cupboards, retrieving dropped objects, staying calm in public, etc.The last type we are discussing are Emotional Support Animals. This one is the most vague and open-ended. An Emotional Support Animal does not have to have any special training and most of the time is registered by its owner because it brings comfort. Also, an Emotional Support Animal does not have to be a dog. These animals are not protected under the ADA and cannot accompany their owners in establishments where there are no animals allowed. Owners with a registered support animals can keep them in housing that otherwise does not allow pets according to the Fair Housing Act.

comfort dog registration

Please Do Not Make Your Dogs Pretend To Be Service Dogs

"Why use service dogs for invisible disabilities?" you ask.

Why not? A disability is a disability, and dogs are amazingly attuned to their humans' needs and moods. Is someone with epilepsy helped less than someone with hearing or vision loss? Not if that dog is trained to help them in the unique ways in which they need help.

Even the government is starting to promote the use of service animals for veterans returning with PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder) because the dog can provide a grounding or stabilizing force for the person with PTSD. Trained dogs can help compensate and care for the disabled person in ways that a routine doctor's visit or medication can't.

Besides, how many people who are blind actually LOOK blind without their white canes? How many people look deaf?

Service dogs, prescribed by a medical doctor, aren't just for certain disabilities, they can be trained to help with MANY disabilities in ways unique to each individual. Examples of invisible disabilities that may be helped by a service animal:

  • Autism
  • Depression
  • Bipolar disorder
  • Borderline personality disorder
  • Mania
  • Multiple sclerosis (MS)
  • Vertigo
  • Rheumatoid arthritis
  • Epilepsy
  • Diabetes
  • Asthma
  • Chronic pain
  • PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder)
  • Brain damage/traumatic brain injury (TBI)
  • Environmentally triggered allergies
  • and many more disabilities!

emotional support animal housing letter

Please Do Not Make Your Dogs Pretend To Be Service Dogs

World's Cutest Kitten Goes To Work.

Some animals have it, others don't.  A service animal needs to be able to cope with the rigors of daily life for it's partner, because we can't do those things for ourselves.  "A service animal is not a pet"  is repeated a zillion times.  That means, first and foremost you and your needs come first.

Willetta is five months old now.  She's still a bit flighty for too much training, but I'm going to start her on the easier tasks.  She needs three tasks that she can perform on command to be legal. They cannot be something a pet cat would do normally, they must relate specifically to my disabilities.  She must be trained to behave well in public at all times, to walk on a leash and always be under control.

So far, she is harness and leash trained.  She rides nicely in shopping cart baskets. If something frightens her, I just hold her and let her investigate from the safety of being held.  Usually once does it.  I purposely take her around noisy grasscutters, construction noises, what ever I can find, or what ever she looks startled at. She rides in the passenger side, and I'll be getting a safety seat for her soon.

The first thing I'll teach her is to be an obnoxious nag.  She already knows how to do this, believe me!  All I do is reinforce her natural tendencies to work for me.  In the first case, to bug me to take my medications until I actually do. This may involve waking me up, getting my attention off the computer (much more difficult)  or distracting me from whatever I am hyper-focused on.  Not only will this be the easiest to train, but it's something I have a problem with that needs to be corrected as soon as possible.  I need a more reliable timer, but I'll start with just my alarm clock.

The hardest part of any training is that I have to be consistent. Obviously, I have a problem with this, or I wouldn't need the service.  It would be nice if I had an experienced trainer to help me, but the only one I know trains dogs and is allergic to cats, so she is an adviser only. Most the training guides out there are for dogs, but hey, Willetta and I are adaptable.

She will also be trained to let me know if someone is at the door, the phone rings, or she hears an emergency vehicle close by.  To pat me if I am having an anxiety attack, the distraction and being able to hold her breaks the pattern.  She will also fetch a small, special phone if I fall and it's not on me.  I may get one that just dials 911 and teach  her to call under the right circumstances.  Now you see why I am starting with the easy tasks!

Training kids, training cats

I rarely leave the house anymore without one of the children asking if Willetta can come out for a walk. As I get further into Willetta's training, I'm less sure about letting the children walk her. But as I watched them gather around her today, each demanding politely a turn with her, I realized it wasn't just Willetta I am training.

These are a really remarkable bunch of children. I think the oldest is about 10, the youngest still not speaking in full sentences, but he can already skateboard. For the most part, they play happily together, watch out for each other and protect the youngest. Squabbles are short and made up quickly. No bullies in this part of the complex, and we all keep a sharp eye out for any that appear. There is always at least one parent in attendance, more as more children get home from school.

Some of the children have half siblings to Willetta, just a month older. One group doesn't have any animals because the Dad doesn't want them, and the little girls are kitten-starved, They come from seven families, and of course, quite varied situations. But when it comes to Willetta, they automatically take turns. Sometimes who's turn and how long is hotly disputed, and she always gets tired before every one gets a turn, but they are good about it.

Some of them are natural animal lovers. One small boy, not yet three, reached out and gently stroked her the first time he met her. There are no animals in his household. But there was the same rapt look in two pairs of blue eyes.

Today was beautiful. One of the neighbors had friends over for a barbecue. These uninitiated folks looked a little bemused when I re-emerged with a small white cat wearing a bright blue vest and walking on a multicolored leash. Children who had been playing all over the court suddenly converged on one spot. The adults looked a bit shocked, my neighbors are so used to it now that I don't think they explained for a few minutes what was going on. Some of my neighbors wandered over to say their own greetings to Willetta and chuck her under the chin. Even the dad who doesn't like animals forgot himself and tickled her and spoke to her like she is a person. He may be beginning to catch up to his childrens level of understanding some day.

I have to explain, usually every time because some of the children are so young, that Willetta has rules and must be walked in a certain way. No yanking on the leash. No screaming our shouting around her...that's actually for me. Only one child touching the leash at a time. Never, ever drag her. Respect her as a being all her own, and her status as my helper. The one child touching the leash at a time is a hard one for them. Willetta is often so surrounded by her fans that she really can't walk much. Today one toddler picked her up, he couldn't quite hold her properly and her eyes crossed a little bit more, but she never struggled. Before I could reach them, three little girls had rescued her.James, the little boy was quite offended. She may have been in a slightly awkward position, but he knows not to hold her too tight. He's a rough and tumble boy, big for his age, but he's gentle with Willetta. He may grab her tail and hold on, but he never pulls it. Again, the crowd of mini mamas rescue Willetta and sooth James frustration.

In time, Willetta was tired and wanted to come to mommy. At this point I get a lot of protests that they haven't had their turn, that she didn't walk for them, they hadn't gotten to hold her. I explain she is a child, just like they are, and she gets tired and needs to lay down. I get hugs and thank you's and the children scatter back to their games.

Now, I am one of them. They break off playing to come say hi or give me a hug. Oh, those hugs are sweet to someone who has no grandkids of her own. Today for the first time, my little redheaded boy came to me and took my hand and wanted to show me something. The "something" turned out to be two of the visiting children wildly riding one of those rides on a spring. They were totally delighted and totally delightful! I have no idea why he wanted to show me that, but he was right, I loved it. After a few more minutes of wild riding, the child on the back hopped off and offered Issac his seat. The happy yells of all three little boys mingled with the background noise of Tag! and My turn! and the smell of good barbecue.

Back inside, I collapsed on the couch, and Willetta sensibly collapsed in front of Moosie, who immediately began to groom her. Watching her look smugly ecstatic and seeing his look of rapt adoration, I think she got the better part of the deal. But then after all, she was the one entertaining a large group of children!

psychiatric service animal

Please Do Not Make Your Dogs Pretend To Be Service Dogs

The ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) legislation, enacted in 1990, is so vague that it has created two classes of service animals. The first is for animals that perform a specific task - Guide Dogs for the blind, wheelchair assistance, hearing dogs, and animals that can detect medical emergencies, like seizures, and summon help. These dogs have been specifically trained for their service mission.

The problem is the second classification - emotional support animals. All animals - lizards, chickens and snakes - can be designated service animals because they lend emotional support to the owner. In most cases they have no task-specific training. While this definition is currently under review, it has placed an enormous burden on those people who truly have a Service Animal.

Bringing your Service Dog into a restaurant, theater, or other public venue can also create some problems unless you can explain that your dog is allowed access under Federal law. Of course this means that you animal must be suited for crowded environments and trained to act properly around people. This is another case where a Service Dog ID Card will be of value.


The (Common) Sense Pet Professionals

New York City esa registration