emotional support dog certification Roseburg Oregon

Service dogs in Roseburg are amazing. They have been extensively trained, live strict but loved lives, and take care of their owners like truly no one else can. The dogs’ abilities to detect seizures, pick up dropped items, and even warn owners of impending stroke or heart attack make these dogs literally life savers.

emotional support animal housing letter

With all the amazing things these animals can do, it’s no wonder we have learned to accept them in places we usually wouldn’t, like a restaurant or the office. But there is a growing cynicism towards service and support animals in general, and mostly because of misunderstanding, and I’ll admit that I used to be one of these people.

I was not raised in a house with pets, and I never could understand the “emotional support animal. I could understand a seeing eye dog or a dog that assists with the hearing impaired, but these are obvious needs that a dog could help with. When I would see articles about an emotional support pig or bunny, I would roll my eyes.

what is an emotional support dog

The Best esa dog in Roseburg

Important Message

Hunter is looking you right in the eye for some straight talk because he would like to have a heart to heart conversation with you.

Hunter is pleading for your help to spread the word about an alarming issue.

Today, Hunter wants to inform the public about a growing problem that is a big concern for all properly trained and registered Service Dogs, and their owners. They do not want to offend anyone or hurt anyone's feelings, but this is an important topic that must be shared. Hunter has actually heard about and seen with his very own brown eyes, dogs who are wearing a Service Dog vest that they have not earned with training or authentic registration. Hunter is shocked when he sees these fake Service Dogs that lack animal training are acting inappropriately in public. He knows at a glance that those dogs are not qualified to wear a real Service Dog vest. He does not blame the dogs, but he would like to speak directly to the people in charge of their pets.

Hunter is aware that it is not the dogs that are responsible for this counterfeit activity. It is the owners who have found a way to bring their pets into places that they would not be allowed otherwise. It seems that if there is anything legitimate, there is an illegitimate copy that can be found. Just like people who sometimes find a way to get fake I.D's for themselves, some are getting fake I.D.'s that look real for their dogs. Pet owners also are able to purchase "Service Dog" vests, which is not against the law. However, Hunter wants you to know it is very wrong to do.

You have already seen a photo of Hunter's vest, that he only wears when on duty in public. I am including a picture of his Service Dog Registration Of America I.D., which is attached to his vest at all times. Hunter's spokesperson and "Handler", Bob, wants to remain anonymous, so I removed his name. Bob wants all the attention to go to Hunter's message. Other legitimate Service Dogs may have certification from other registries.

Hunter understands that many people love their dogs and want to keep them with them whenever possible. He knows what it is to be loved like that. He also knows that it takes some particular character traits and training to be a real Service Dog. Hunter has earned the right to go where other dogs should not go, and he is true to the assistance animal's code of ethics.

I made mention that Hunter has eyeballed dogs with wannabe Service Dog vests on that display inappropriate behaviors which make them totally unsuitable for real dog assistance duties in the public. They can be insufferably annoying, because of their lack of obedience training at best or dogs PTSD. They may be doing regular dog stuff like sniffing people, jumping on people, barking or just being silly. They may be doing things that are of greater concern, such as running about, threatening with a growl or other behaviors, biting or even urinating on the floor of a business. They may create safety issues that put the public at risk. A well-trained guide dog would never do those things while on duty. A Service Dog "Handler" is responsible for keeping their dog focused and would not think of allowing their dog to be disruptive in any way. There are times when Hunter does bark, but it is for specific reasons to keep the people he serves safe.

These pretenders are making it more difficult for Hunter and other legitimate Service Dogs. Please, listen to Hunter when he says:

"Please Don't Make Your Dog Pretend To Be A Service Dog!"

He Is A Dog

Hunter the Service Dog likes to play in the snow when he and Bob go outside for chores. Hunter keeps an eye on Bob intermittently while taking time for himself to enjoy a little cool down in the snow. I watched and smiled as he would repeatedly stick his head in the snow with his rump up in the air. He was just so cute and it was plain to see that he was most definitely enjoying himself.

When this handsome hound goes to town in the winter, he often wears boots to protect his feet from the salt and other chemicals used on roads and parking lots. But, at home, Hunter prefers to go barefoot in the snow.

On a personal note, Hunter is one of those rare dogs that just naturally has chosen to “go” in the woods for his private duties. He is, however, still a dog and I noticed he did mark my tires. That made me smile too.

Hunter is trusted to have the run of the yard and lives in harmony with the birds, squirrels and even a deer that stopped by the yard. He sees everyone, but its Bob that he focuses on. It is easy to see that these guys are buddies and have a wonderful friendship, as well as a great working relationship.


Hunter Is Family

Once inside again, Hunter made his way quickly to Linda to make sure all was well with her.

Every greeting seems like its the first one of the day in this harmonious household.

It is a joy to visit this little family.

In Training

I am honored to have the opportunity to be a voice for Hunter, who has some serious things to talk about. He is living out his calling in life as a Service Dog, that he volunteered himself for, he is a natural. When he stepped up for the job, Bob and Linda decided to have Hunter become official. When that vest is on, this dog is on duty at full alert.

It is interesting that dogs know when there is going to be bad weather that could be dangerous, and Hunter is one of those furry friends that knows instinctively, and will warn his people before hand. They have learned to take his warning seriously. Hunter may have saved lives at a campground one summer. No storm was forecast, but out of nowhere a terrible storm came with strong winds and destroyed to campground knocking down most of the trees. The campers had been evacuated because of one smart dog.

The fight to have laws passed for people with special needs to be able to bring their service animals into public places with them was long. People's unruliness and unlawful behavior of bringing their pets places with them into public places should not be accepted, because they could potentially ruin it for people who by law have that privilege.

Linda has been having health problems that have either landed her in the hospital or in a nursing home. Bob and Hunter go to visit her everyday. When visiting the nursing home, Hunter does not wear his vest because the people who live there want to pet him. Hunter is trained to not allow himself to be petted while wearing the vest. So! He is being of service to many as a comfort dog or therapy dog.

esa service dog

Please Do Not Pet Service Dogs On Duty

If you are in the US, you may have heard of emotional support animal or ESA. An emotional support animal works like a companion animal for people and patients, for offering therapeutic benefits. Usually such animals are either cats or dogs, although a patient can choose other pets. The whole purpose of an ESA is to offer relief and support for disability, psychological symptoms or emotional stress. Check some of the basic facts you need to know before getting an ESA certificate.

The procedure

To get an emotional support animal, you have to check with your physician to consider the option of proving verifiable disability, as stated by law. Your doctor or medical professional will give a note or a certificate, which will mention the concerned disability and the need for emotional support animal that will offer therapeutic care and healing. However, the animal isn't treated a service animal and therefore, there is no need for any formal training. In fact, all domesticated animals, including rodents, birds, reptiles, cats and dogs, can become an ESA.

There are professional companies, which can assist you in evaluating if you qualify for ESA evaluation letters, but these services are just meant for assistance. Ultimately, only licensed medical health professionals can offer you the certificate on their professional paper. Check online and you can find simple forms that will help finding your qualification. Don't miss on asking the rules and regulations with your doctor in detail. As a pet owner, you have to find the benefits of having an ESA, so that you can exercise your rights.

emotional support animal flying

How to Act Around a Service Dog: Etiquette for Everyone

If you are in the US, you may have heard of emotional support animal or ESA. An emotional support animal works like a companion animal for people and patients, for offering therapeutic benefits. Usually such animals are either cats or dogs, although a patient can choose other pets. The whole purpose of an ESA is to offer relief and support for disability, psychological symptoms or emotional stress. Check some of the basic facts you need to know before getting an ESA certificate.

The procedure

To get an emotional support animal, you have to check with your physician to consider the option of proving verifiable disability, as stated by law. Your doctor or medical professional will give a note or a certificate, which will mention the concerned disability and the need for emotional support animal that will offer therapeutic care and healing. However, the animal isn't treated a service animal and therefore, there is no need for any formal training. In fact, all domesticated animals, including rodents, birds, reptiles, cats and dogs, can become an ESA.

There are professional companies, which can assist you in evaluating if you qualify for ESA evaluation letters, but these services are just meant for assistance. Ultimately, only licensed medical health professionals can offer you the certificate on their professional paper. Check online and you can find simple forms that will help finding your qualification. Don't miss on asking the rules and regulations with your doctor in detail. As a pet owner, you have to find the benefits of having an ESA, so that you can exercise your rights.

comfort dog registration

Adventures in Service Cat Training.

There is controversy surrounding the roles of animals in the lives of people with disabilities or chronic illnesses. Many of us have seen the posts online about registering your animal as an emotional support animal with a small fee, and being able to keep your animal in a no pets allowed setting. This has led people to question the legitimacy of all service animals and their roles. A feeling of distrust among people who do not understand the difference between these animals, and the rights that accompany them, has been emerging as more people utilize these services.

Service Dogs are the most protected and trained of the 3 types of dogs. While many people refer to all 3 types as "service animals", the official names for this type is Service Dog. These dogs are legally considered medical equipment and have a price tag to match, ranging from $10,000- $50,000. They are intensively trained for 1.5-2.5 years, having to pass a variety of tests to be serviceable including, but not limited to, opening cupboards, retrieving dropped objects, staying calm in public, etc.

The last type we are discussing are Emotional Support Animals. This one is the most vague and open-ended. An Emotional Support Animal does not have to have any special training and most of the time is registered by its owner because it brings comfort. Also, an Emotional Support Animal does not have to be a dog. These animals are not protected under the ADA and cannot accompany their owners in establishments where there are no animals allowed. Owners with a registered support animals can keep them in housing that otherwise does not allow pets according to the Fair Housing Act.


The (Common) Sense Pet Professionals

Oregon emotional support dog certification